Update: March 2019

Preschool

English/Language Arts: Pre-K students With modeling and support, explore relationships between word meanings. (Vocabulary)

Math: Pre-K students will Order objects by measurable attributes (e.g., biggest to smallest, etc.)

Kindergarten

English/Language Arts: Kindergarten students are learning about maps and map symbols. The teacher is supporting student learning about the relationship between illustrations and the story in which they appear to describe important details in the story’s characters, events and setting. They are also reading informational texts and describing how the photos, tables and illustration help them remember information about a topic. Kindergarten students are using letter/sound knowledge to read and write simple unfamiliar words. They are breaking words to hear dominant sounds and blending them to make a word. Students are gaining more sight word knowledge to help make reading and writing easier. They are writing 2 or more sentences to tell a story or some facts or their opinion. Students should be able to read texts with 2 or more lines of text and be able to talk about the story and its meaning or information given.

Math: To begin the month, students begin working with the numbers 10 to 20, seeing that “-teen” numbers can be seen as “10 and some more.”. They are given opportunities to count forward and backward and read and write numerals to 20. They will begin to think of the numbers from 11 to 20 as “10 and some more.” They will also explore combinations to numbers from 5 to 10, such as 2+3=5, 4+1=5, etc… Students have many opportunities to form important connections between a number’s quantity, how it is written, and how it is said. As the month continues, students have experiences with  measurement. They focus on comparing the weights of objects, stressing the concepts of heavier and lighter. Then, students estimate and count capacity in non-standard units, with a focus on counting by 10s and 1s.

1st Grade

English/Language Arts: First grade students are learning about maps, landforms and how we use maps. Students are learning how to identify important details and information from illustrations. They are describing the characters, setting and events using the information from both the illustrations and the words. In non-fiction texts, students are describing the important details gained from the illustrations, photos, and diagrams as well as the words. First grade students are learning and using the different vowel sounds, long or short, to read and write unfamiliar words. They should be able to write the dominant sounds in 4 or more letter words easily and words that follow a vowel pattern. Students are reading texts that have short paragraphs with dialogue and interesting characters and plot. They are gaining over 100 sight words that they can read and write. In writing, they are writing opinion pieces, narrative stories, or informational pieces with an introduction, supporting details or sequential events and a closing statement. They are learning how to research information to provide answers to their questions.

Math: Students focus on addition and subtraction story problems and fact strategies to 20. Students make double-flap dot cards and picture cards, write sets of fact family equations and story problems to match. They model and solve addition combinations to 20 on their number racks, identifying such strategies as working with easier combinations like 10 + 4 and 7 + 7 to solve more challenging combinations such as 9 + 4 and 7 + 8. Using their number racks and the fact strategies they’ve been working on, students solve three types of addition and subtraction story problems: result unknown (10 + 4 = ? and 15 – 6 = ?), change unknown (10 + ? = 14 and 15 –? = 9), and start unknown (? + 4 = 14 and ? – 6 = 9). Students also work with part-whole and comparison situations. Beginning to write equations to match the story problems is emphasized throughout.

2nd Grade

English/Language Arts: Second grade readers are learning about how to use maps to determine landforms, water, or living areas. They are learning to evaluate illustrations and they support the words and the plot. They are learning how to determine how to compare and contrast what is seen in the illustrations to what is read/heard in the text. In non-fiction texts they are learning to analyze the information from different images and texts to develop a coherent understanding of a topic or issue. Students are reading chapter books and writing about what they are reading. They are developing sight word knowledge for hundreds of words for reading and writing. Students are writing opinion pieces, narrative stories and informational pieces in which they introduce a topic or characters, give details or events and provide a concluding statement or section. Their writing should be easy to read.

Math: Students focus on addition and subtraction story problems and fact strategies to 20. Students make double-flap dot cards and picture cards, write sets of fact family equations and story problems to match. They model and solve addition combinations to 20 on their number racks, identifying such strategies as working with easier combinations like 10 + 4 and 7 + 7 to solve more challenging combinations such as 9 + 4 and 7 + 8. Using their number racks and the fact strategies they’ve been working on, students solve three types of addition and subtraction story problems: result unknown (10 + 4 = ? and 15 – 6 = ?), change unknown (10 + ? = 14 and 15 –? = 9), and start unknown (? + 4 = 14 and ? – 6 = 9). Students also work with part-whole and comparison situations. Beginning to write equations to match the story problems is emphasized throughout.

3rd Grade

English/Language Arts: Readers in 3rd grade will be finishing up their experiences with books by the same author. Setting, theme, and plot will be used to develop understandings of the events between books. Our reader’s notebooks are continuing to grow as we all respond to books by writing about thinking. We will begin looking at informational text again and paying special attention to authors and their development on ideas and topics. 3rd grade writers will continue to engage in the writing process and we are striving to get quicker with the process. We are working hard on planning, drafting, and revising all in one sitting, especially when attempting to write in front of a computer. As we move through March, students will be using at least two sources to develop an analysis to a proposed prompt.

Math: In the beginning of the month, students are introduced to the concept of area of rectangles and squares that are measured in square units. After measuring paper rectangles and surfaces around the classroom in nonstandard units, students move into estimating and measuring area in customary units: Square inches, square feet, and square yards. Students begin to investigate the link between area and multiplication, discovering that the area of a rectangle can be efficiently calculated by multiplying its side lengths. As the month progresses, students explore the attributes of quadrilaterals. Students continue to strengthen their understanding of polygons by building a variety of polygons out of toothpicks. After building squares, rectangles, and a variety of rhombuses, students work up to multi-sided polygons having as many as 12 sides (dodecagons). Then, students create polygons to match clues given in the form of geometric attributes. They sort quadrilaterals and write quadrilateral riddles. To wrap up the month, students estimate and measure the perimeters of 5 different quadrilaterals.

Science/Social Studies Connections: Students will be finishing up studies for Black History Month. Different forms of energy will be studied throughout the month of March.

Social/Emotional Learning: The 3rd grade students will finish up solving problems collaboratively and move into Unit 6 of CASEL-Celebrating Diversity which will also fit nicely into the reading activities.

4th Grade

English/Language Arts: 4th grade readers are analyzing mythology in the month of March. We will be finishing our study of mythology and students should be able to explain the characteristics of myths and similarities and differences between them. We will begin looking at informational text again and paying special attention to authors and their development on ideas and topics. More than one type of informational reading will be used to gather ideas and new information. Writers in 4th grade are continuing to write opinion and informational pieces based on a question or a prompt. Through these questions or prompts, students must add new knowledge from informational readings to create a written piece. We are working on becoming quicker writers so that we can complete a piece in one sitting especially with the use of more than one text to develop a response.

Math: Students begin the month by making the connection between division and equivalent ratios. They solve division problems, share strategies, and work together to create a class chart for division strategies. As the month progresses, students identify, draw, compare, analyze and classify angles. Students study angles in isolation as well as those in two-dimensional figures. They use two very basic benchmarks-the 90° right angle and the 180° protractor. Students then move into the study of circles in which students identify parts of a circle, learn that there are 360° in a full turn, and discover that angles, rather than being static, are measures of rotation. Students identify and draw parallel and perpendicular lines as they practice drawing a variety of angles and lines. Students review different types of triangles, quadrilaterals, and other polygons. To end the month, students review concepts related to measuring area and perimeter. They make observations concerning types of measure, which leads to generalized formulas.

Science/Social Studies Connections: Fourth grade students will be thinking about electricity, heat, and matter. Students will learn to understand that when an object is broken into smaller pieces, or when a solid is dissolved in a liquid, or when matter changes state, the total amount of matter remains constant. Students will also see that energy can be transferred from one location to another and can be transformed from one form to another. Lastly, electrical energy in circuits can be transformed to other forms of energy including light, heat, sound, and motion.

Social Studies: Students will be thinking about economics and history. Students will come to realize that Ohio’s location and many natural resources helped our states economy grow. Students will learn that businesses opened throughout the state making everything from steel to glass, to rubber. In the late 1800s, people came from all over the world to find jobs. Ohio’s cities grew making it an exciting time in our state’s history.

Social/Emotional Learning: Students in fourth grade will be demonstrating the steps in the decision making process. Once the steps are established, students will apply the model to solve an interpersonal problem by discussing consequences, solutions, and evaluating the results.

5th Grade

English/Language Arts: 5th graders will be reading informational texts again and understanding how authors develop their information around a topic. As readers, we must be able to access more than one source when learning about a new topic. We gain different perspectives and knowledge which we use to increase our understandings. Writers in 5th grade will be utilizing at least two sources of information to write to a prompt using evidence to support their thinking. Students will be refining their abilities to construct a written response in one sitting, at a computer. Writers will learn the importance of all aspects of the writing process and will be shown how to engage in them more quickly.

Math: To begin the month, students model and solve story problems that involve dividing whole numbers by unit fractions, and then model and solve problems in which fractions are divided by whole numbers. Students then move onto graphing on a coordinate grid. Students build a variety of cube and tile arrangements from which they determine ordered pairs. They graph the ordered pairs, often graphing two sets of ordered pairs on the same grid in order to compare sets of information. Students use their observations to understand relationships between numbers. They analyze patterns and move toward determining information about any arrangement number. Students then review shapes and their properties-especially triangles and quadrilaterals-and practice classifying two-dimensional figures based on properties. The goal is to see the relationships among the properties of shapes. To end the month, students learn to measure dimensions to find the volume of rectangular prisms, where the unit of measurement is a cubic unit.

Science/Social Studies Connections: In Science, students will begin their study of Earth Science by focusing on cycles and predictable patterns in the solar system. Students will study the solar system, the sun, and all celestial bodies that orbit the sun. A large component of this unit is that each planet has unique characteristics and the sun is one of many stars that exist in the universe.

Social/Emotional Learning: Students in 5th grade will be focusing on Unit 5-Solving Problems Collaboratively. This skill will assist the students in school as well as with real world concerns.

6th Grade

English/Language Arts: Students will be focusing on argumentative writing. They have read a variety of texts that will lend themselves to the argument piece for this nine weeks. It focuses on our essential question: How is modern technology helpful and harmful to society?

Math: Students are finishing up their Algebra unit and will be moving into geometry. This is a fun unit with plenty of opportunities for hands on activities. Students will be completing multiple real world activities as well.

Social Studies: Students are finishing their exploration of Ancient Mesopotamia and moving on to Egypt, Africa, the Indus River and China. They will continue to explore patterns of change in continuity by focusing on the expansion of and the decline of civilizations, patterns of geography, and development of political, economic, and societal systems

Science: Students will be finishing up working on speed. Then, they will be working on Atoms and Elements. During this unit, students will be discussing protons, neutrons and electrons. The scientists will be focusing on the first twenty elements of the periodic table.

7th Grade

English/Language Arts: The essential question for our unit is, ‘Should we make a home in space?’ The students have two important writing assignments and continue practicing for their state test. They have assignments posted on My Perspectives to help them in their studies.

Math: “Probability and Solving Word Problems.” There are three concepts that will be covered in this chapter: 1) The use of a Linear Model to represent part-to-whole relationships, 2) investigate probability of multiple events along with theoretical and experimental probability and 3) use of the “5-D” process, drawing-describing-defining elements of a word problem.

Social Studies: Students will study the causes and disputes within the Christian Church and how it led to the Protestant Reformation Movement. In addition, they will exam the efforts to reform the Catholic Church led to changes in society and the creation of new churches.

Science: Students will finish up their Water unit learning about Weather, Water Quality, and Currents in the Ocean. This month, as a grade level, students will be focusing on strengthening our ability to recognize vocabulary terms, and the ability to read using context clues. This unit includes many new vocabulary terms, so there will be a large focus on “word dissections” in Science this month

8th Grade

English/Language Arts: Students are wrapping up argumentative texts and practicing argument skills through bracket battles and the game Snake Oil!

Math: Students will be working with data and graphs. They will start off with circle graphs and comparing two sets of data. Next, students will move into scatter plots and finding a line of best fit, so we will be revisiting some ideas about slope and y = mx + b. They will be interpreting data in tables and graphs and using slope as a rate to make comparisons and predictions on a graph.

Social Studies: Students are working on Westward Expansion and The Industrial Revolution. They will be able to explain how westward expansion contributed to not only economic, but also industrial development.

Science: Students will be starting the Life Science Unit in March. They will be able to explain that every organism alive today comes from a long line of ancestors who reproduced successfully every generation. Students will be focusing on DNA, Genes, and Traits.