For additional information or if you have questions, please contact the Office of State & Federal Programs 330-841-2321, ext. 7213.
Federal Title I Program Information

Target-assisted Program
School-wide Program
School Improvement Program
Neglected Program
Delinquent Program
Homeless Program

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), Title I, became law April 11, 1965. Since this time, the law has been amended three times: In 1988, 1995 and most recently amended by the Improving the Academic Achievement of the Disadvantaged, No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) of 2001.

Schools: Schools are eligible for Title I services if 35% or more of the students are on free/reduced lunch (Public Law 103-382); and schools are eligible for school-wide projects if 40% or more students are on free/reduced lunch.

District: The District through its analysis of data, the needs of the students it services, and planning with the funds available, determines the appropriate program and the grade levels it will focus on to improve student achievement. While all buildings in a district may be eligible to be served by Title I funds, the District may concentrate on the buildings with the greatest student need.

The Warren City School District utilizes all of its Title I funds to provide services in each of the following buildings: Jefferson PK-8, Lincoln PK-8, McGuffey PK-8, Willard PK-8, and Warren G. Harding High School.

Other Services: In addition to services provided to District students on a daily basis, Title I provides funds to service special need populations of students. The Warren City School District receives additional funds to provide supplemental services for neglected and delinquent students.

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Target-assisted Program

Components

  1. All children served by Title I are found eligible using multiple academically-related and objective criteria.
  2. The program coordinates and supports the regular education program, which may include assisting preschool children in the transition from early childhood programs like Head Start, Even Start, Early Reading First, or preschools run by state or District funds.
  3. The program incorporates Title I planning into existing school planning and the building of complete needs assessment of the entire school based on the achievement of children in relation to state academic and achievement standards.
  4. The program uses Title I resources to help participating children meet the state student academic standards expected for all children in reading and mathematics.
  5. The program uses effective methods and instructional strategies that are based on scientific research, which gives primary consideration to providing extended time, helping provide an accelerated and high quality curriculum, and minimizing removal of students from the regular classroom during regular school hours for Title I instruction.
  6. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT), as defined by federal law.
  7. The program coordinates and integrates federal, state and local services, including all title in NCLB, violence prevention, nutrition and housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education and job training.
  8. Provides strategies to increase parental involvement requirements.

The program provides sufficient professional development opportunities with Title I and other resources -- if possible for teachers, principals, instructional paraprofessionals; and if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents and other staff to become highly qualified.
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School-wide Program

Components

  1. A comprehensive needs assessment of the entire school based on information, which includes the achievement of children in relation to the state academic content standards and the state student academic achievement standards.
  2. School-wide reform strategies based on scientific research, which strengthens the core academic program, increases the amount and quality of learning time and includes strategies to address needs of low-achieving students.
  3. Instruction by Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT), as defined by federal law.
  4. Highly qualified, ongoing professional development based on scientifically-based research for teachers, principals, instructional paraprofessionals; and if appropriate, pupil services personnel, parents and other staff.
  5. Strategies to attract Highly Qualified Teachers (HQT) to high-need schools.
  6. Strategies to increase parental involvement such as family literacy services.
  7. Plans to assist preschool children in transition from early childhood programs to local elementary school programs.
  8. Measures to include teachers in the decisions regarding the use of Ohio Proficiency Tests and other assessments to improve the achievement of individual students and the overall instructional program.
  9. Activities to ensure that students who experience difficulty mastering the proficient or advanced levels of academic achievement standards required are provided with timely and additional assistance.

Coordination and integration of federal, state and local services programs, including all title in NCLB, violence prevention, nutrition and housing programs, Head Start, adult education, vocational and technical education and job training.

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School Improvement Program

  • Funds provided support for the Ohio Improvement process (OIP) through monthly meetings at the district and building levels, as well as teacher-level meetings weekly.
  • Additional funds are used to support the after school intervention programs in Reading and Mathematics throughout the school year.
  • Fiscal Year 2016 allocation: $265,000.000

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Neglected Tutorial Program

  • Tutors are provided to give assistance to resident students at the Trumbull County Reeves Road Group Home. The services include help with homework, expanding students' content knowledge and technology resources to enable students to achieve at a rate similar to other students in their class.
  • One teacher representing 1 Full-time Equivalent
  • Five tutors working after schools hours providing .9 Full Time Equivalent
  • Serving 25 students
  • Fiscal year 2016 allocation: $42,667.05

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Delinquent Program

  • Services are provided at the Trumbull County Detention Center (Juvenile Justice Center )
  • One teacher representing 1 Full-time Equivalent
  • Teaching approximately 143 students on a regular basis
  • Fiscal Year 2016 allocation $97,503.23

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Homeless Program

  • The purpose of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Children and Youth Program is to ensure that all children and youth have equal access to the same free and appropriate public education, including preschool education as non-homeless children and youth.
  • State and local educational agencies are required to develop, review and revise policies to remove barriers to the enrollment, attendance and success in school that homeless children and youth may experience. Local educational agencies must also provide homeless children and youth with the opportunity to meet the same challenging state content and state student performance standards to which all students are held.
  • For additional information or if you have questions, please contact the Outreach Office, Warren City School District, 330-841-2321, ext. 7220.

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For additional information or if you have questions on any Title 1 Programs, please contact the Office of State & Federal Programs, Warren City School District, 330-841-2321, ext. 7213.

Warren City School District's Title I Program
District/Building Information Title I Program for Students The District is providing services for students at several different grade levels in all of Warren City School's buildings. At the PreK-8 level, Title I funds are providing supplemental intervention support in reading and mathematics, preschool and instructional coaching in literacy and mathematics.  At the high school, Read 1800 reading services for 9th and 10th grade students, and supplemental instructional intervention for all grades after school.

District/Building Information

Free and Reduced Lunch Statistics for Each Building

 
Building/District Information Number of Students Number Qualified for Free/Reduced Lunch Percentage of School population F/R
Jefferson PK-8 700 626 89.43%
Lincoln PK-8 1223 717 58.63%
McGuffey K-8 721 513 71.15%
Willard K-8 870 687 78.97%
Warren G. Harding 1530 1065 69.61%
District 5044 3608 71.53%
Information changes as student move between buildings and districts. The above information is based upon October, 2014 information.

Building Eligibility and Service Provided

Free and Reduced Lunch Statistics for Each Building

Building Information Title I Eligibility Title I Served/ Program
Jefferson PK-8 X School-wide Program
Lincoln PK-8 X School-wide Program
McGuffey K-8 X School-wide Program
Willard K-8 X School-wide Program
Warren G. Harding X School-wide Program
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Title I Program for Students

Services provided . . . . Reading:
  • Reading Recovery teachers each work with 9-12 at-risk students in first grade, plus small groups of struggling readers using guided reading and Level Literacy Lessons (LLI).
  • Read 180 teachers each work with classes of 15-20 at-risk students in ninth grade, breaking the class into small groups for guided reading, independent reading, and reading comprehension.  The program uses computers to assist with instruction.
  • Staff development activities utilize literacy and mathematics coaches to provide general classroom support for the implementation of instructional frameworks in literacy and mathematics, PK-8. Teachers participate in building and grade level meetings throughout the school year. During the meetings teachers discuss instructional practices and observe a model classroom.
  • Literacy Coaches to support classroom instruction PK8.
  • Leveled Literacy Intervention Tutors
Math:
  • Math Coaches to support classroom instruction PK8
Preschool/ Kindergarten Program:
  • Instructional Assistants for all classrooms.
  • Jump start Transition from Preschool to Kindergarten
 Intervention:
  • After School literacy intervention grade 1-8
  • After school intervention provide in content areas at the high school.
Family Events:
  • Grade level programs take place throughout the school year at each building and include home activities to support instruction in both literacy and mathematics.
 General Information:
  • The title I program is evaluated annually with the results used to plan the next school year program.
  • Parents are provided the opportunity to share with the schools the responsibility of helping their child achieve to their potential in school through completing a Parent-School-Compact annually.
 
  • Parents are also provided the opportunity in the fall to request information about the qualifications of the teachers working with their child.

More Information

www.lcosu.org www.readingrecovery.org  

Summary of the Title I Program in the Warren City School District

  • Personnel totaling 51.08 full time equivalents.
  • Reading Recovery Teachers, Preschool Teachers, Literacy Coaches, Math Coaches and Read 180 Teachers assigned to the following school wide program buildings:
Building Grade Levels FTE
Jefferson PK-8 PK-8 8.75
Lincoln PK-8 PK-8 8.25
McGuffey K-8 PK-8 7.25
Willard K-8 PK-8 9.5
Warren G.Harding 9-12 3.0
  • 13.33 Full-time Equivalent classroom professionals
  • 1 Full-time Equivalent for family programming
  • The Title I Program serves approximately 5,044 students in the public and non public schools program.
  • The total allocation for FY 2016 is $4,631,330.00
Questions or input regarding Title I services are welcome. Annually parents can provide input in person by attending the annual Title I Program meeting conducted at the building/district or can contact: Warren City Schools Office of State and Federal Programs at 330-841-2321, ext. 7203. Return to top of page