Updated: March 2020

Kindergarten

English/Language Arts

  • Characters in a story can be different or alike
  • Notice what the characters say and what they do
  • Think about why a character says or does something
  • The pictures and the words show where a story happens
  • The illustrator shows information in the pictures that the author does not tell well in the words
  • The illustrator shows sound, movement, details in background, and draws the character to look the same in a book.
  • Write about an opinion, informational, or narrative piece
  • Delete beginning sound of a word
  • Form letters with writing tools
  • Recognize letters as consonants and vowels
  • Recognize beginning consonant sounds and the letters that represent them

Math

  • Understand the numbers from 11 to 20 as “10 and some more”
  • Solve number combinations within 10
  • Explore weight and capacity concepts
  • Count groups of objects by 10s and 1s to build an understanding of place value

Grade 1

English/Language Arts

  • Writers use rhyming words, sound words, or nonsense words to make stories interesting
  • Writers play with the way words.
  • Writers use speech and thought bubbles to show what characters are saying or thinking
  • Authors write books to make it fun to read.
  • Authors write books to give information, get you to think or to do something
  • The author gives a message in a story or in a nonfiction book
  • Write an opinion that introduces a topic, expresses an opinion, supplies a reason, an provides a sense of closure
  • Change the ending sounds to make and solve new words
  • Every syllable has a vowel sound.
  • Recognize and use consonant digraphs at the beginning/end of a word
  • Use letter sound relationships to help spell an unknown word

Math

  • Write equations to match the problems
  • Use place value strategies to add and subtract up to 100
  • Measure, order, and compare height in inches
  • Write equations to match the problems
  • Use place value strategies to add and subtract up to 100
  • Measure, order, and compare height in inches

Grade 2

English/Language Arts

  • A biography is a story of a person’s life written by someone else.
  • Authors of biographies usually tell about a person’s life in order that it happened
  • Think about why the writer wrote a book about a person
  • Nonfiction authors write facts about a topic
  • Sometimes nonfiction authors divide a topic into smaller parts
  • Nonfiction authors care about their topics
  • Think about why the topic of a book is important
  • You can learn about the same topic in different books
  • Write an opinion piece that introduces a topic, expresses an opinion, supplies reasons using linking words, and provide a concluding statement
  • Recognize and use consonant letters that represent two or more different sounds at the beginning of a word
  • Recognize and use letter combinations that represent long vowel sounds
  • Recognize and use letter combinations that represent unique vowel sounds

Math

  • Recognize that equal parts of identical wholes do not need to be the same shape
  • Estimate, measure, and compare the lengths of objects in centimeters and meters
  • Split whole shapes into 2, 3, 4, or 8 equal parts called halves, thirds, fourths/ quarters or eighths

3rd Grade

English/Language Arts

  • The author usually tells about a person’s life in the order it happened
  • The author of a biography gives an important message
  • Sometimes writers choose language to make you feel a certain way
  • Sometimes writers use punctuation in interesting ways
  • Sometimes writers create humor in their stories
  • Writers think about where to place the words and illustrations on a page
  • The author gives us a message in a fiction/nonfiction book
  • More than one author can give the same information
  • Authors write books to interest you or entertain you, to give information or to get you to think about something
  • Tell the characters, setting, problem, important events, and solution when you tell about a fiction story
  • Tell the most important information when you tell about an informational book
  • Tell the important events in order when you tell a biography
  • Write an opinion and/or expository nonfiction piece
  • Recognize and use homographs
  • Recognize and use words with multiple meanings
  • Recognize and use consonant letters that represent no sound

Math

  • Describe and classify two-dimensional shapes, especially quadrilaterals
  • Calculate area and perimeter
  • Represent fractions as parts of a whole shape

4th Grade

English/Language Arts

  • Explore language and demonstrate strategic thinking across multiple genres, including literature, informational texts, and poetry
  • Integrate information two texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgably.
  • Think critically about informational texts in terms of quality of writing, accuracy, and the logic of conclusions
  • Provide specific examples and evidence (either orally or in writing) to support written statements about the quality, accuracy, or craft of a text
  • Critique the quality or accuracy of a text, citing evidence for opinions
  • Provide concluding statements or section related to the opinion stated.

Math

  • Measure angles and determine angle measurements based upon given information
  • Sort and classify shapes based upon the number and kinds of sides and angles they have
  • Calculate the area and perimeter of rectangles
  • Review equivalent fractions, and add and subtract fractions and mixed numbers

5th Grade

English/Language Arts

  • Explore historical fiction, expository nonfiction, revisit traditional literature in depth and their big ideas
  • Understand the elements that make up each genre
  • Writing About Reading in relation to Historical Fiction
  • Predict logically, supported by evidence, what will happen next in a text or what a character will do
  • Integration information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably
  • Think across texts to compare and expand understanding of content and ideas from academic disciplines

Math

  • Multiply fractions by whole numbers.
  • Use rectangular arrays to show multiplication of a fraction by a fraction.
  • Divide a whole number by a fraction.
  • Divide a unit fraction (a fraction with a 1 in the numerator) by a whole number

6th Grade

English/Language Arts:

In language arts we are coming to the end of unit 3 Modern Technology: Argumentative Writing. The essential question is:How is modern technology helpful and harmful to society?  The students are working  and learning in cooperative teams to finish the final reading passages in the textbook.  The cumulative writing sample will require students to write a multi-paragraph response convincing readers whether modern technology is helpful or harmful.  They will be expected to cite textual evidence to support a position on the topic.  Students will be expected to take a position and generate a thesis statement along with three reasons to support the thesis and add a satisfying conclusion with a call to action.  Students will be expected to use two passages from familiar readings to gather and cite evidence. They will also incorporate persuasive writing techniques such as pathos, logos and ethos and transitional words in their essays. The essays will be graded according to the state rubric.

Math:

The students will be beginning Chapter 6.  The students will work with division and fractions and make sense of both before developing algorithms.

Social Studies:

Ancient Greek Civilization

 Focus: GRAPES: Geography, Religion, Achievements, Politics, Economics, Social Structure

* Early Greek Civilization

*Religion, Philosophy, and the Arts in Ancient Greece

* Daily Life in Athens

* Sparta and Athens

* The Spread of Greek Culture

Science:

Students will be learning about physical sciences including speed and velocity calculations, and circular motion. 

7th Grade

English/Language Arts: 

This month in Language Arts we will be working on close reading strategies and taking a look at theme, plot, and the way authors introduce and develop these in their writing. We will also continue working on our argument writing, and introducing strategies to break down writing prompts and organize our ideas.

Math:

In March, 7th grade mathematics students in Ms. Kelsh’s class will investigate probability using a deck of cards and a random number generator.  Students will learn to represent multiple events using a probability tree, a list, and a table.  They will also revisit the idea of the fairness of events and compare experimental and theoretical probabilities. This section will introduce the 5‑D Process as a problem-solving method.  Students will learn how to understand a problem by drawing, describing, and defining its elements.  They will learn strategies that lead to writing and solving equations later in the course.

Compacted Math:

During the month of March, advanced 7th grade math students will be studying and identify the relationship between distance, rate, and time and will use it to solve word problems.  Students will connect their work with percents and scale factors to solve new problems involving part-whole relationships.  They will also develop strategies to solve equations with fractional and decimal coefficients.  In addition, students will explore percent change and simple interest. Students will begin to solve equations that have fractional or decimal coefficients, find the whole amount if you only know a percentage of it, and vice versa. They will also calculate simple interest and set up and solve proportional equations.

Social Studies:

In the month of March we will be learning about Islamic History and Achievements, the Crusades and the Empires of Africa and the Sub-Saharan Slave Trade. 

Science:

7.ESS.2 Thermal-energy transfers in the ocean and the atmosphere contribute to the formation of currents, which influence global climate patterns.
7.ESS.3 The atmosphere has different properties at different elevations and contains a mixture of gases that cycle through the lithosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere and atmosphere.

Throughout March we will be going over concepts involving air and ocean currents and their effects on global climate.  We will also be learning about the atmosphere, its different layers and the properties of those layers.

8th Grade

English/Language Arts:

In the month of March students will be finishing unit 3 on “when it is right to take a stand”. They will be completing an argumentative writing essay and participating in “AIR Test Tuesdays” where they will learn strategies for the upcoming state test.

Math:

Students will learn about compound interest and use patterns of growth to write expressions.  They will analyze the patterns in tables, graphs, and expressions to compare linear and exponential growth.  Students will learn new ways to rewrite numbers and expressions involving exponents.  They will also learn how to perform operations with these numbers and expressions.  Students will learn how to distinguish functions from other relationships by examining their graphs and tables.  Finally, they will investigate a variety of functions and learn how to describe them completely.

Algebra 1:

Students will develop a method to change a quadratic equation written as a sum into its product form (also called its factored form).  Then they will learn shortcuts for factoring some quadratics.  Through a fun application, students will find ways to generate each representation of a quadratic function (rule, graph, table, and situation) from each of the others.  They will also develop a method to find the x-intercepts of a parabola using the Zero Product Property.  Then students will see another way to write the equation of a parabola, called graphing form, and use square roots to find the x-intercepts.  Finally, students will “complete the square” to change between standard form and graphing form of a quadratic function.

Social Studies:

In the month of March we will be learning about the U. S. Constitution/Bill of Rights and American Government. 

Science: 

Eighth grade will continue their learning in life science.  We will discuss traits, genes and alleles and how these are passed from parents to offspring.  We will talk about Mendelian Genetics and Laws and how Gregor Mendel studied pea plants to formulate those laws.  Punnett squares will be created and explained through academic vocabulary.